Master of Science in Investigations:
Financial Crimes Investigation

The Financial Crimes Investigation concentration examines a broad spectrum of financial crimes. This concentration prepares you to tackle cybercrime, financial fraud, international crime, healthcare fraud, and organized crime to name a few. This concentration can be further customized to focus on the private sector or public sector investigation, depending on your career interest.

The program requires 30 units of graduate credit for the degree.

Required Courses (21 credits)

  • CJST 6631 – Investigations I
  • LSTD 6620 – Regulation & Occupational Fraud
  • CJST 6651 – Criminal Procedure
  • INVS 6601 – White Collar Crime Analytics
  • INVS 6690 – Contemporary Topics in Investigations
  • CJST 6630 – Financial Crimes Investigation
  • CJST 6600 Computer Crimes: Legal Issues & Investigative Procedures

Financial Crimes Electives (9 credits)

Choose three elective courses. Below is a sample of some of the classes offered:

  • INVS 6610 – Transnational and Organized Crime Investigations
  • INVS 6611 – Contemporary Topics in Cybercrime Investigations
  • INVS 6622 – Bribery & Corruption Investigations
  • INVS 6627 – Identity Fraud Investigations
  • INVS 6629 – Evolving Trends of Financial and Cyber Crimes in an EMV World
  • INVS 6640 – International Gambling, Fixing, and Corruption
  • INVS 6602 – Contemporary Fraud Schemes
  • INVS 6603 – Contemporary Topics in Money Laundering
  • INVS 6626 – International Gambling, Fixing, and Corruption
  • INVS 6639 – Global Perspectives of Multi-national Private Sector Security Operations
  • INVS 6676 – American Sports Corruption
  • INVS 6677 – International Financial Networks of Crime and Corruption
  • INVS 6605 – Topics in White Collar Crime
  • FORS 6670 – Investigations in Trafficking in Persons
  • INVS 6621 – Cybercrime: From Counterfeiting to Digital Currency
  • INVS 6634 – Criminal Tax Investigations
  • INVS 6649 – Big Data Analytics and Human Trafficking
  • INVS 6671 – Blockchain Technology & Investigations

Students are not limited to courses in the Investigations catalog for electives and may take courses in criminal justice, white collar crimes, national security, and digital forensics investigations or other programs. It is recommended that students discuss elective selections with their advisor to maximize the educational and career opportunities.  Based on a student’s work experience or previous course work, certain core requirements may be substituted by other courses. Substitutions in the core can be made for students looking for opportunities entering the private sector.